Category Archives: Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

TaxMama’s TaxQuips Highlights of Trump Tax Plan

  Today TaxMama® wants to give you an advance peek on what you can expect from a Donald Trump tax plan, coming to a Congress near you! Dear Friends and Family, Today we face a total paradigm shift in our government. Donald Trump is the President-Elect of the United States of America. So, with that […]

Ready for End-of-year Tax Planning?

CCH Suggests Steps to Consider Before Time Runs Out (RIVERWOODS, ILL., November 2, 2011) ­ As the clock winds down on the 2011 tax year, now is the time for taxpayers to look at their financial situations, consult tax and accounting experts and determine if they can be better positioned for filing income tax returns […]

The Magic Number

Today TaxMama hears from Bill in the TaxQuips Forum, who is carrying a heavy load. “My wife and I pay almost $150k per year in Federal taxes and another almost $50k in state income taxes with most of it coming from W2 earnings.  I’m really tired of paying this much money to those in government […]

Per Diem Wasted

Today TaxMama hears from Bob in the TaxQuips Forum, who is trying to get it right. Let me summarize.  “I live in NJ and had a temporary job in DC for 6 months in 2010 (total 196 calendar days). I used Pub 1542 [per diem rates] for DC of $258 per day ($65 M&IE and […]

Six Facts the IRS Wants You to Know about the Alternative Minimum Tax

Courtesy of IRS The Alternative Minimum Tax attempts to ensure that anyone who benefits from certain tax advantages pays at least a minimum amount of tax. The AMT provides an alternative set of rules for calculating your income tax. In general, these rules should determine the minimum amount of tax that someone with your income […]

Prepaid Medical Insurance

Today TaxMama hears from Elaine in the TaxQuips forum, who tells us. “I have a client that is retiring now at age 55. He will receive $185,000 in deferred compensation. The company will withhold $111,000 for lifetime medical insurance for him. Can the whole $111,000 be deducted in the year paid?”